Psychosocial interventions for families of children with diabetes mellitus type 1

Parents may have difficulty balancing caring for their child with other demands and can experience increased stress, sadness, or family conflict. Psychosocial interventions for families of children with diabetes mellitus type 1 may include educational interventions, counselling, psychotherapy and contact with support groups.

Question

What systematic reviews are there on psychosocial interventions for families of children with diabetes mellitus type 1?

Identified literature

Table 1. Systematic reviews with low/medium risk of bias
CYP = Children and young people; GHb glycated haemoglobin = Glykosylerat haemoglobin; T1D = Diabetes type 1
1 HbA1c is a form om haemoglobin that is formed when haemoglobin reacts with blood sugar i.e. glucose.
Included studies Population/Intervention Outcome
Armour et al, 2004 [1]
19 randomized controlled trials Any person (<18 years) with Type 1 or 2 diabetes and any family member living in the home, including parent, spouse, sibling, aunt, uncle, or grandparent.
Family interventions were classified as either knowledge focused (e.g. of treatment and handling of diabetes-related symptoms and care, family knowledge sharing), behavioural (e.g. skills training [aiding with injections, glucose monitoring, foot care], health-seeking behaviours, physical activity, diet), or psychosocial (coping skills, family cohesion, conflict-resolution skills, self-efficacy of family or household members of people with diabetes, frequency of diabetes-related conflict, problem solving).
Knowledge (e.g. of treatment and handling of diabetes-related symptoms and care, family knowledge sharing)
GHb glycated haemoglobin
Authors' conclusion:
“Evidence suggests that family interventions in family or household members of people with diabetes may be effective in improving diabetes-related knowledge and glycaemic control.”
Charalampopoulos 2017 [2]
Ten eligible trials of three educational and seven psycho-educational interventions Children and Young Persons up to 24 years with Type 1 Diabetes
Included interventions were targeting CYP, their families and/or health care professionals that aimed to improve management of diabetes in children.
Glycaemic control measured by percentage of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)1; secondary outcomes psychosocial functioning, diabetes knowledge, adverse and other clinical outcomes.
Authors' conclusion:
“There is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of particular psycho-educational programme for CYP with T1D in the UK. Further trials with sufficient power and reporting”

References

  1. Armour, T. A., Norris, S. L., Jack, L., Jr., Zhang, X., & Fisher, L. (2005). The effectiveness of family interventions in people with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review. Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association, 22(10), 1295-1305.
  2. Charalampopoulos, D., Hesketh, K. R., Amin, R., Paes, V. M., Viner, R. M., & Stephenson, T. (2017). Psycho-educational interventions for children and young people with Type 1 Diabetes in the UK: How effective are they? A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 12(6), e0179685. doi:https://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.017968.

SBU Enquiry Service Consists of structured literature searches to highlight studies that can address questions received by the SBU Enquiry Service from Swedish healthcare or social service providers. We assess the risk of bias in systematic reviews and when needed also quality and transferability of results in health economic studies. Relevant references are compiled by an SBU staff member, in consultation with an external expert when needed.

Published: 1/7/2020
Contact SBU: registrator@sbu.se
Report no: ut202001
Registration no: SBU 2019/691