Occupational Exposures and Cardiovascular Disease

This document was published more than 2 years ago. The nature of the evidence may have changed.

Conclusions

  • People in the following groups more often develop heart disease over time than people who are not subjected to- the specified exposure at work:
    • Those with job strain (i.e. experience psychological demands, but lack Control of their own working situation); or those who experience work as mentally stressful; or those who lack control; or those who experience effort-reward imbalance
    • Those who experience low social support at work; those who experience injustice at work; or those who have insufficient opportunities for personal development; or those who experience job insecurity
    • Those who work night schedules; or have long working weeks
    • Those who are exposed to noise
  • People in the following groups more often develop stroke over time than people who are not subjected to the specified exposure at work:
    • Those who lack control
    • Those who have shift-work
    • Those who are exposed to noise
    • Those who are exposed to ionizing radiation at work
  • People in the following groups more often develop hypertension over time than people who are not subjected to the specified exposureat work:
    • Those who experience job strain (i.e. find their work demanding, but lack Control from their working situation); or those who experience effort-reward imbalance
    • Those who have shift-work
    • Women and men with similar occupational exposures develop cardiovascular disease to the same extent, in relative terms. During the working years, the risk for men to suffer or die acute myocardial infarction or stroke approximately doubles that for women.
    • Cardiovascular disease has serious consequences for affected individuals, their families and the society. Prevention has the potential to reduce suffering for the individual and to save resources. This report presents research-based knowledge about occupational exposure and cardiovascular disease that is useful for future interventions in the workplace.

Studies of high or moderate quality used for results and conclusions in the present report

How to cite this report: SBU. Occupational exposures and cardiovascular disease. Stockholm: Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services (SBU); 2015. SBU report no 240 (in Swedish).

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SBU Assessment presents a comprehensive, systematic assessment of available scientific evidence. The certainty of the evidence for each finding is systematically reviewed and graded. Full assessments include economic, social, and ethical impact analyses.

SBU assessments are performed by a team of leading professional practitioners and academics, patient/user representatives and SBU staff. Prior to approval and publication, assessments are reviewed by independent experts, SBU’s Scientific Advisory Committees and Board of Directors.

Published: 8/26/2015
Contact SBU: registrator@sbu.se
Report no: 240
http://www.sbu.se/240e

Project group

Experts

Töres Theorell (Chair), Stockholm University

Katarina Jood, University of Gothenburg

Joep Perk, Linnæus University

Lisbeth Slunga Järvholm, Umeå University

Eva Vingård, Uppsala University

Per-Olof Östergren, Lund University

SBU

Charlotte Hall (Project Director)

Therese Kedebring (Project Administrator)

Karin Stenström (Assistant Project Director)

Lena Wallgren (Scientific Writer)

Marie Österberg (Data Extraction to Tables)

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